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Caloocan City

Caloocan
Philippines

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Filipino

English

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about

Caloocan City is one of the cities that make up Metro Manila, the National Capital Region of the Philippines. With its geographical location set in the northern part of the metropolis, it is bordered by several cities and municipalities, including Quezon City to the southeast, Malabon City and Navotas to the west, and Valenzuela City to the north. The city has a rich historical and cultural heritage, with its origins tracing back to the early colonial period under Spanish rule. Caloocan has a demographic makeup that is highly diverse in ethnicity, culture, and economic status, reflective of its role as part of the country's urban hub. It is predominantly a residential and industrial area, with bustling markets, numerous factories, and dense residential neighborhoods. The city shares the same characteristic urban problems with other Metro Manila cities, such as traffic congestion, pollution, and overpopulation. Caloocan is a melting pot of different cultures and traditions due to the constant migration and settlement of people looking for opportunities in the National Capital Region. The city’s economy is largely based on services and manufacturing, with several small and medium enterprises contributing significantly to its local economy. Educationally, Caloocan hosts a number of notable educational institutions which accommodate students from various parts of Metro Manila. Culturally, Caloocan City is known for its vibrant local festivals such as the Libad Festival and the Pangisdaan Festival, which showcase the city’s rich traditions and community spirit. From a historical perspective, Caloocan played a crucial role during the Philippine Revolution against Spanish colonial rule and during the Philippine-American War. One of the city’s landmarks is the Bonifacio Monument, which is dedicated to Andrés Bonifacio, a Filipino revolutionary leader and the founder of the Katipunan, a movement which sought Philippine independence from Spain. Demographically, the city has a population comprised of a mix of various ethnic groups from across the Philippines, resulting in a rich blend of languages, cuisine, and cultural practices. Its high population density is indicative of the broader pattern of urban migration, which concentrates people in search of work and better living standards in Metro Manila. Despite the challenges of urban living, Caloocan remains a dynamic city with a strong sense of community and resilience. Its role in the broader narrative of Filipino history and continued importance as a center for commerce and industry ensures that this city will remain an integral part of the social and economic fabric of the Philippines.

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